Oakland Press – Oakland County’s opioid dataset portal provides information for residents and advocates

In 2016, over 30 county residents died from opioid abuse.

The county is trying to combat this issue with new data sets and information related to opioid abuse on its Access Oakland website.

A new open data portal focused on opioids, launched July 10, is now available

Oakland County Health Division Manager Leigh-Anne Stafford said the site was launched to raise public awareness of the opioid epidemic, and to try to be proactive in responding to this problem in Oakland County.

A few of the portal’s key feature include an interactive map that will allow users to view prescription drug drop-off locations, county prevention sites and resources, treatment locations and a map of all Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous meetings in the county.

Stafford said the portal will act as a one-stop shop for prescription drug abuse information, which has been gathered from a variety of resources across the county.

Resources include the Oakland Community Health Network, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, the Oakland County Sheriff’s office, local law enforcement agencies, Alliance of Coalitions for Health Communities, Southeastern Michigan Health Association and the Oakland County Medical Examiner’s Office.

“Having this online data access point will allow us to target our prevention, treatment, and law enforcement efforts in the areas of most need, as well as promoting prevention, treatment and recovery resources to residents in an interactive, visual manner,” said Stafford.

By the numbers

• Since 2010, according to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, 134 Oakland County residents have died from an opioid overdose.

• According to the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office, 18 lives were saved in 2015 when deputies used Naloxone. In 2016, the sheriff’s office saw a nearly 300 percent jump when 50 people’s lives were saved.

• In 2016, 743,969 opioid prescriptions were filed in the county

• In 2016, 6,409 residents were treated for opioid abuse

Opioid deaths in Oakland County

• 2010, 10

• 2011, 10

• 2012, 13

• 2013, 14

• 2014, 21

• 2015, 33

• 2016, 33

RELATED: Gov. Snyder’s order makes naloxone easier to get in Michigan but won’t encourage more use says Sheriff Bouchard

RELATED: Mental Health Authority taking steps to combat substance abuse

RELATED: County launches website aimed at safe disposal of prescriptions

RELATED: Michigan’s new prescription drug monitoring program launches, aims to combat opioid abuse

RELATED: Sheriff Bouchard says state’s drug monitoring program “doesn’t hold anyone accountable”

RELATED: County Prescription Drug Abuse Partnership recognized by Harvard University

RELATED: Birmingham students hear first-hand of effects of substance abuse

RELATED: Increase in use of naloxone leads to rising cost of saving lives in Oakland, across country

Grateful Prisoners share their touching stories after visit by 2017 UFAM Rally Speakers

2017 UFAM Speakers

2017 UFAM Rally Speakers visited the G. Robert Cotton Facility at the Jackson State Prison on May 17th.

Three National Speakers were fortunate to speak to over 400 prisoners at the G. Robert Cotton Facility at the Jackson State Prison, a part of the Michigan Department of Corrections and over 100 prisoners at the Ingham County Jail. The reception by staff and inmates for Matt Butler, John Shinholser and  Scott Masi, was overwhelming.  Brighton Center for Recovery is in it’s 6th year of doing this, including a visit to the Oakland County Children’s Village. Below are a few poignant, supportive and hopeful kites (letters), that Warden Shawn Brewer, of the G. Robert Correctional Facility, shared with UFAM organizers: “Thank you for allowing the Unite to Face Addiction presentation. I lost my mate to an overdose; I’m here for purchasing drugs for her. She did not have to die. I hope I can become peer support through an organization like this. Thank you for all that your staff has done to help me – to help myself.” “I hope my letter finds you well, and those you love. Sir, it’s my deepest desire to reach out and help others whom may have experienced addiction, family members that suffer from addictions, losses from addiction, and recovery. In addition, someone may have experienced the loss of child/children to state/count due to active addiction. Sir I have a testimony to share, hopes, strengths, the arrest of my addictions in prison where substances can be abundant, behaviors that dictate returning to active addiction if not addressed presently. I have a background that inside the walls dictates respect – however for I may be from old behaviors, it’s the new lease on life, and the freedom from active addiction that gives me my spiritual awakenings. This may sound crazy to some; I am right where I’m supposed to be, at this time in life. There is but one thing that can change the very essence of man. That is time. It does not occur instantly, so, for my time I am blessed. If at any time before I am released I may be of assistance to one’s recovery, both inside or out – I would be honored to do all I can via my story. I’ve tried several things in life to maintain my recovery – all what I am supposed to do – give back. Thank you for your willingness for progress and events.” “Hello and God Bless. I am writing today to thank you for helping to set up the meeting today. It was very helpful to my recovery to know I can and will make it and to know there are people within the MDOC and here at JCF/Cotton who care about the prisoners. And about how we will do once we are returned back into the community. I thank you for this and everything else you do here at JCF/Cotton. NA-AA meetings are big for me and helping in my recovery and to be able to help others with the same issue I have had but also to hear success stories of coming back from the dark and into the light. I am a success story in the making. I believe in myself. Thank you from me, my son and my family. Thank you so much for your help in becoming the person, daddy and hero I know and will be for my son and myself. God Bless.” “Thank you for bringing in the Unite to Face Addiction Program today.” “Hello and God Bless. I am writing today to thank you for helping in making the meeting happen today. That is what we need in here. Real people who have been through it as we have. That has come from the dark side and went to the light and has stayed there. I know it will not be all fun and games once I am released and this today helped me. I will be paroling very soon so I needed this. I am a recovering addict and I am and will be a success story because I am really wanting my recovery for me not anyone else. If I cannot do it for me or love myself how can I love or do it for anyone else. I cannot wait to get back home to my son. I will be there to be his daddy, father, and hero once again. All of these resources will help once I am released so I think you again. And so does my family and my son in helping in my recovery and not hindering it. Thank you so much for your help. At least there are people here that care and are willing to help us become a better part of our community. God Bless”

Unite to Face Addiction – Michigan – Save a Life With Naloxone Training!

Be the Voice of Change

Thursday, May 18th a few thousand people will gather on the lawn at the Michigan State Capital Building for the Unite to Face Addiction 2nd Annual Rally & Advocacy Day. And with a slogan like, “Be the Voice of Change,” and opening remarks from Michigan Lt. Governor Brian Calley,  it promises to  pack a triple punch of entertainment, education and advocacy.

One of the special events at the Rally will be free Naloxone training in the Resource tent on the North lawn.  And three educators: Dr. Michael Mullins; instructor Jeannie Richards of Brian’s Hope; and instructor Kathy Redding of Capital Area Project VOX will conduct the training. Training is at 11:00 AM and 2:00 PM and you can register before the event.

The no needle, auto-injection products were graciously donated by Kaleo Pharmaceuticals and Adapt Pharma.  And each participant will leave with two auto injector naloxone or two Narcan nasal spray products.  And clear instructions on how to use them and save a life.

Naloxone Training

Opioid overdoses have become a national epidemic and they are the leading cause of accidental deaths in Michigan. Opioid overdoses happen when there are so many opioids or a combination of opioids and other drugs in the body, that a person becomes unresponsive to stimulation or is unable to breath. The kits pictured below could save the life of someone who has overdosed. And Naloxone can reverse opioid overdoses if administered quickly.   Instructor Kathy Reddington says, “I’m not sticking to a strict schedule and I will train stragglers until 1:00. If any one comes to the Resource Tent who has not registered, I’ll train them. It is really important that these kits get into the community, there are programs for high schools and police stations in the area. And UFAM is a great opportunity for us to educate a large audience.”      

Register

The training will take place in the Resource Tent on the North Lawn during the Rally on May 18th.

Visit the Opioid Prevention & Training Page.