Fox 2 News “Let It Rip” Panel to include UFAM Speakers Judge Jodi & Scott Masi

In the News

Two segments discussing Narcan, the Opiate Overdose Reversal Medication, and current issues surrounding Marijuana.

Promises to be a spirited discussion this morning on FOX 2 Let it Rip Weekend Edition at 9:30 AM Sunday, with 2017 UFAM Rally Speakers Judge Jodi Debbrecht Switalski & Scott Masi.  Masi posted last night to his Facebook Page, “Always a spirited discussion. Looking forward to participating with my friend Jodi Debbrecht Switalski.”

Scott Masi, UFAM Organizer, explains how one dose of naloxone may not be enough

Masi & Naloxone
By: Randy Wimbley POSTED: MAY 25 2017 11:30PM EDT UPDATED: MAY 25 2017 11:30PM EDT

The State of Michigan is throwing a haymaker in the fight against the opioid crisis. This latest move stems from legislation passed late last year to combat what has become an epidemic.

“This here is the overdose kit that we were distributing. The same stuff that we would be giving out at the pharmacy level.”

Now people with opioid addictions or their relatives will be able to by the overdose reversal drug, Naloxone or Narcan, over the counter.

Governor Rick Snyder approved a standing order from the Department of Health and Human Services allowing pharmacies to dispense the drug.

“I think it’s very important that it’s readily available so we can save lives,” said Dr. Shaun Jayakar of St. John Providence.

Fox News Edge at 11pm

The move comes as the number of deaths caused by opioid overdoses continues to rise, and the drugs are getting stronger.

“One application of Nalaxone might not be the antidote like it used to be because of the continued potency, the continued synthetic component that is being put into and utilized in the heroin that is being distributed on the street,” said Scott Masi at the Brighton Center for Recovery.

Those buying Naloxone can get enough for one treatment – but there is no limit on refills.

Before the order, only law enforcement, first responders, and doctors would administer Nalaxone. That won’t be the case anymore.

“If you give this medication they become agitated, they can become restless, their heart can race so ideally it would be a medication prescribed by a doctor. However, with this epidemic of deaths due to overdoses, i think the benefits outweigh risks,” said Dr. Jayakar.

Those in need of the overdose reversal drug may experience sticker shock at their local pharmacy.

“The nasal spray is going to be around $150 without insurance. If your insurance covers it, it will just be your co-pay. It injectable, the really expensive one is going to be around $4,500 to $4,900,” said Ghada Abdullah at Park Pharmacy.

There’s another potential drawback – will a readily available fix to an opioid overdose encourage more abuse?

“I personally don’t believe that this is going to be something that someone’s going to take to a party and say, ‘Hey guys we can get high just because we have this Narcan’, I really doubt that’s going to happen,” said Abdullah. “It’s just going to help save someone’s life.”

Now pharmacies have to register with the Department of Health and Human Services to dispense Naloxone, and they have to keep track of who’s buying it and how much.

Gov. Rick Snyder authorizes standing order to make naloxone widely available in Michigan

Snyder and Naloxone
Lifesaving medication now available for eligible individuals at pharmacies

Thursday, May 25, 2017

LANSING, Mich. – Gov. Rick Snyder today authorized the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services to issue a standing order pre-authorizing the distribution of naloxone by pharmacists to eligible individuals.

“Naloxone is a tool in the fight against opioid addiction that can save lives immediately and we need to make sure all residents statewide have access, both in rural areas and urban centers,” Gov. Snyder said. “Our entire state has been affected by this horrible epidemic. I have said that state government will use all possible resources to reverse the course of the opioid crisis. This is one more action that demonstrates our full commitment to addressing the problem.”

Naloxone is a fast-acting medication that reverses opioid overdose. Pharmacies that obtain the standing order will be able to dispense naloxone to those at risk of an opioid-related overdose, as well as family members, friends, or other persons who may be able to assist a person at risk of an overdose. Currently, naloxone is only available to be administered by law enforcement or other first responders.

“As we continue our fight against opioid addiction, this order makes naloxone more accessible for those most likely to need it,” said Dr. Eden Wells, chief medical executive of MDHHS. “This is a vital step in reducing deaths related to opioid addiction in Michigan. By allowing for shorter response times in emergency situations, we can help save lives.”

States nationwide have experienced a dramatic increase in the number of opioid-related overdoses in recent years. In Michigan, the number of heroin-related overdose deaths increased from 1.1 per 100,000 residents in 2007 to 6.8 per 100,000 residents in 2015. Opioids, including heroin and prescription drugs, accounted for 473 deaths in 2007; in 2015, that number increased to 1,275.

As part of their final recommendations, Gov. Snyder’s Prescription Drug and Opioid Abuse Task Force found that naloxone is a safe and lifesaving drug that should be more accessible. In 2016, Public Act 383 was passed giving the chief medical executive authority to issue a standing order that does not identify a patient for the purpose of dispensing naloxone. To dispense naloxone under the standing order, pharmacies must register with MDHHS online at www.michigan.gov/naloxone.

When obtaining naloxone from a pharmacy, individuals will be provided with the steps for responding to an opioid overdose as well as important information about where to go for treatment services. Pharmacies will be required to keep track of the amount of naloxone dispensed and will report these numbers to MDHHS on a quarterly basis.

To learn more about drug treatment services available near you, visit www.michigan.gov/bhrecovery.

Courtesy of: http://www.michigan.gov/snyder/0,4668,7-277–413050–,00.html

Add Your Lost One to a Nat’l Map to put Michigan’s Faces to Numbers – PLEASE SHARE

Celebrate Lost Loved Ones

Celebrating Lost Loved Ones to the Opioid Epidemic

Please take a moment and add your lost loved one to this map that’s going to be show-cased at a National Convention in July. It is vital that UFAM floods this map with the pictures of our loss.  We must put faces to the numbers.

“The rise in deaths due to prescription drugs and heroin is alarming. Often times society may have a perception of who this is. The fact is they are everyday people we love, everywhere. Click the ‘Contribute Lost Loved One‘ to add a loved one.”

 

Grateful Prisoners share their touching stories after visit by 2017 UFAM Rally Speakers

2017 UFAM Speakers

2017 UFAM Rally Speakers visited the G. Robert Cotton Facility at the Jackson State Prison on May 17th.

Three National Speakers were fortunate to speak to over 400 prisoners at the G. Robert Cotton Facility at the Jackson State Prison, a part of the Michigan Department of Corrections and over 100 prisoners at the Ingham County Jail. The reception by staff and inmates for Matt Butler, John Shinholser and  Scott Masi, was overwhelming.  Brighton Center for Recovery is in it’s 6th year of doing this, including a visit to the Oakland County Children’s Village. Below are a few poignant, supportive and hopeful kites (letters), that Warden Shawn Brewer, of the G. Robert Correctional Facility, shared with UFAM organizers: “Thank you for allowing the Unite to Face Addiction presentation. I lost my mate to an overdose; I’m here for purchasing drugs for her. She did not have to die. I hope I can become peer support through an organization like this. Thank you for all that your staff has done to help me – to help myself.” “I hope my letter finds you well, and those you love. Sir, it’s my deepest desire to reach out and help others whom may have experienced addiction, family members that suffer from addictions, losses from addiction, and recovery. In addition, someone may have experienced the loss of child/children to state/count due to active addiction. Sir I have a testimony to share, hopes, strengths, the arrest of my addictions in prison where substances can be abundant, behaviors that dictate returning to active addiction if not addressed presently. I have a background that inside the walls dictates respect – however for I may be from old behaviors, it’s the new lease on life, and the freedom from active addiction that gives me my spiritual awakenings. This may sound crazy to some; I am right where I’m supposed to be, at this time in life. There is but one thing that can change the very essence of man. That is time. It does not occur instantly, so, for my time I am blessed. If at any time before I am released I may be of assistance to one’s recovery, both inside or out – I would be honored to do all I can via my story. I’ve tried several things in life to maintain my recovery – all what I am supposed to do – give back. Thank you for your willingness for progress and events.” “Hello and God Bless. I am writing today to thank you for helping to set up the meeting today. It was very helpful to my recovery to know I can and will make it and to know there are people within the MDOC and here at JCF/Cotton who care about the prisoners. And about how we will do once we are returned back into the community. I thank you for this and everything else you do here at JCF/Cotton. NA-AA meetings are big for me and helping in my recovery and to be able to help others with the same issue I have had but also to hear success stories of coming back from the dark and into the light. I am a success story in the making. I believe in myself. Thank you from me, my son and my family. Thank you so much for your help in becoming the person, daddy and hero I know and will be for my son and myself. God Bless.” “Thank you for bringing in the Unite to Face Addiction Program today.” “Hello and God Bless. I am writing today to thank you for helping in making the meeting happen today. That is what we need in here. Real people who have been through it as we have. That has come from the dark side and went to the light and has stayed there. I know it will not be all fun and games once I am released and this today helped me. I will be paroling very soon so I needed this. I am a recovering addict and I am and will be a success story because I am really wanting my recovery for me not anyone else. If I cannot do it for me or love myself how can I love or do it for anyone else. I cannot wait to get back home to my son. I will be there to be his daddy, father, and hero once again. All of these resources will help once I am released so I think you again. And so does my family and my son in helping in my recovery and not hindering it. Thank you so much for your help. At least there are people here that care and are willing to help us become a better part of our community. God Bless”

Unite to Face Addiction – Michigan – Save a Life With Naloxone Training!

Be the Voice of Change

Thursday, May 18th a few thousand people will gather on the lawn at the Michigan State Capital Building for the Unite to Face Addiction 2nd Annual Rally & Advocacy Day. And with a slogan like, “Be the Voice of Change,” and opening remarks from Michigan Lt. Governor Brian Calley,  it promises to  pack a triple punch of entertainment, education and advocacy.

One of the special events at the Rally will be free Naloxone training in the Resource tent on the North lawn.  And three educators: Dr. Michael Mullins; instructor Jeannie Richards of Brian’s Hope; and instructor Kathy Redding of Capital Area Project VOX will conduct the training. Training is at 11:00 AM and 2:00 PM and you can register before the event.

The no needle, auto-injection products were graciously donated by Kaleo Pharmaceuticals and Adapt Pharma.  And each participant will leave with two auto injector naloxone or two Narcan nasal spray products.  And clear instructions on how to use them and save a life.

Naloxone Training

Opioid overdoses have become a national epidemic and they are the leading cause of accidental deaths in Michigan. Opioid overdoses happen when there are so many opioids or a combination of opioids and other drugs in the body, that a person becomes unresponsive to stimulation or is unable to breath. The kits pictured below could save the life of someone who has overdosed. And Naloxone can reverse opioid overdoses if administered quickly.   Instructor Kathy Reddington says, “I’m not sticking to a strict schedule and I will train stragglers until 1:00. If any one comes to the Resource Tent who has not registered, I’ll train them. It is really important that these kits get into the community, there are programs for high schools and police stations in the area. And UFAM is a great opportunity for us to educate a large audience.”      

Register

The training will take place in the Resource Tent on the North Lawn during the Rally on May 18th.

Visit the Opioid Prevention & Training Page.

     

Mark Lundholm, Returns to Emcee the 2017 2nd Annual UFAM Rally May 18th!

Mark Lundholm, EMCEE

Mark has performed in all 50 states and 10 foreign countries. From world-renowned musicians, heads of state, fortune 500 companies to rehabilitation centers and convicted felons, Mark has truly entertained on the world’s stage.

He’s appeared on Comedy Central, Showtime, A&E, CBS, and NBC. Mark wrote and performed his own one-man show off-Broadway in New York City reaching critical acclaim, and in his spare time created the now staple DVD series ‘Humor in Treatment’ and the Recovery Board Game.

Mark is a person in long-term recovery.

Mark Lundholm Website